• A ship and boat attacking a whale.

    A ship and boat attacking a whale.

    Local Māori traded food, water and firewood with whalers, in return for goods such as iron tools and muskets. With the increase of sealing and deep-sea whaling, Kororāreka (Russell) in the Bay of Islands became their haven of rest and recreation. Māori boarded vessels as crew members and visited Port Jackson (Sydney). They were generally treated well, but there were incidents of abuse.
    A ship and boat attacking a whale. From: Foreign field sports, fisheries, sporting anecdotes … Drawings by Howitt, et al. London: Edward Orme, 1814.
  • A sawyer’s clearing in a forest of kauri…

    A sawyer’s clearing in a forest of kauri.

    The timber trade flourished in the early 1820s with an increasing demand for timber for houses and ships. Skilled tradesmen were required and the Māori were keen to learn and willing to work in return for goods such as tools, blankets, tobacco and firearms.
    A sawyer’s clearing in a forest of kaur … From: Edward Jerningham Wakefield. Illustrations to Adventure in New Zealand. Drawings by Mrs Wicksteed, et al. London: Smith, Elder, 1845.
  • Louis de Sainson. Showing the village of Kororareka as it appeared to the French expedition led by Dumont D’Urville in 1827.

    The village of Kororareka, by Louis de Sainson.

    Louis de Sainson. Showing the village of Kororareka as it appeared to the French expedition led by Dumont D’Urville in 1827.
    Louis de Sainson. Showing the village of Kororareka as it appeared to the French expedition led by Dumont D'Urville in 1827. Image ref: 1295-1.