• Frederick Maning. Old New Zealand: a tale of the good old times by a Pakeha Maori.

    Old New Zealand: a tale of the good old times by a Pakeha Maori.

    Frederick Edward Maning was born in Dublin to Anglo-Irish parents. He arrived at Hokianga from Hobart in 1833 and eventually settled in Kohukohu amongst the Te Ihutai. Maning engaged in various small scale ventures and was renowned for being shrewd and ruthless when dealing with others. In 1839, he built a house at Ōnoke, and settled into family life with Moengaroa. In early 1865, he retired from the timber and gum trade and entered the public service as a judge of the Native Land Court, until retirement in 1876.

    These reminiscences were printed in 1863. The term Pākehā Māori, which Maning applies to himself, was coined to describe 19th-century Europeans who largely adopted Māori ways of life.
    Frederick Maning. Old New Zealand: a tale of the good old times by a Pakeha Maori. Auckland: Robert J. Creighton and Alfred Scales, 1863.
  • Baron de Thierry’s self portrait. From: Baron Charles De Thierry. Letters and papers. GNZMS 56.

    Baron de Thierry’s self portrait.

    Baron de Thierry’s self portrait. From: Baron Charles De Thierry. Letters and papers. GNZMS 56.
  • Seal belonging to Baron de Thierry, with wax impression. OCM Ephemera Collection.

    Seal belonging to Baron de Thierry.

    Baron de Thierry’s claims centred on his connection to the French King Charles X, his godfather. When he bought land in the Hokianga, he titled himself, “Sovereign Chief of New Zealand”.

    This seal represents his principality at Mount Isabella, Rangiāhua and consists of two Māori bearing a coat of arms with the inscription, “ TENAX Strength and Harmony”.

    When his settlement failed in 1845, de Thierry moved to Auckland, where he earned a living as a music teacher.
    Seal belonging to Baron de Thierry, with wax impression. OCM Ephemera Collection.
  • Seal belonging to Baron de Thierry, with wax impression. OCM Ephemera Collection.

    Wax impression of Seal belonging to Baron de Thierry.

    Baron de Thierry’s claims centred on his connection to the French King Charles X, his godfather. When he bought land in the Hokianga, he titled himself, “Sovereign Chief of New Zealand”.

    This seal represents his principality at Mount Isabella, Rangiāhua and consists of two Māori bearing a coat of arms with the inscription, “ TENAX Strength and Harmony”.

    When his settlement failed in 1845, de Thierry moved to Auckland, where he earned a living as a music teacher.
    Wax impression of seal belonging to Baron de Thierry OCM Ephemera Collection.
  • Letter from Reverend Kendall to Baron de Thierry.

    Letter from Reverend Kendall to Baron de Thierry.

    In this letter the missionary Thomas Kendall reports his failure to secure land for Baron de Thierry. He eventually purchased a block of land at Rangiāhua, Hokianga, from the chiefs Muriwai, Patuone and Nene in 1822. De Thierry’s arrival in Hokianga in 1837 did not bring trade or prosperity to the region, but he added character and flair.
    Letter from Reverend Kendall to Baron de Thierry. 3 December 1822. From: Baron Charles De Thierry. Letters and papers. GNZMS 56
  • John Webster. Maori journal. Vol. 1, 1847. NZMS 116.

    John Webster. Maori journal.

    Scottish born John Webster came to Hokianga in 1841 and created his fortune as the district’s leading timber trader. Webster married one of Tāmati Wāka Nene’s relatives and fostered enduring relationships with leading Māori and Pākehā figures of the time. The illustrated title page of his Māori journal depicts his Opononi homestead on the southern shores of Hokianga. Adjacent to this residence he built a wharf, gum store and trading store which he eventually sold when he retired to Auckland. He died at his son’s residence in Devonport in 1912.
    John Webster. Maori journal. Vol. 1, 1847. NZMS 116.